DESIGN

 

EUREKA STUDIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re a rural community design center and outreach facility, originating from the Small Town Studio at Kansas State University’s College of Architecture, Design, and Planning.

 Our Story:

We are a rural community design center, part of CAMPESTRAL Inc. We offer design and planning services with flexible fees. We work with the small-town studio of Kansas State University. We offer realistic and workable solutions to rural problems. We use instinct and ingenuity. We have a simple and effective process. We are a regional center for rural engagement. We host events and exhibits for university and non-university participants. The Studio is a unique and innovative off-campus laboratory. We support students, faculty, professionals, and the community. Eureka Studio is an interdisciplinary initiative to address rural issues in Kansas. We offer strategies to make small communities stronger and more resilient. Eureka Studio engages various stakeholders in a design laboratory to explore alternatives for rural re-development.

In 2010 locals referred to Eureka Kansas as a “dying town”, not with anger or sadness, but with an eerie resolve.

It could be argued that Eureka was on a downward path for over a hundred years. In 2011, we met the Small-Town Studio at Kansas State University, a group of graduate architects and their professor Todd Gabbard from the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. They came for a visit and accepted the challenge of an in-depth study of our community. They brought with them a wealth of knowledge, unbridled enthusiasm and an unstoppable energy.

It was a unique opportunity for our community to see the intersection of architecture, community and business. We started a conversation about possibilities and the process of architecture. That conversation continues three years later. The small town has always had a place and relevance in the culture of our nation. Now in this increasingly connected world, the small town is seeing a rebirth of interest and opportunity. The conversation has evolved from theory and process to real world projects. It is now about the work and the finished product. The students are realizing that the process of architecture is becoming very personal.

It is hard to see the future, to determine the effects of this conversation. It is abundantly clear that the small town has a future and we have been reminded that we can dream.

The students that have come to Eureka over the years have gone on to new challenges throughout the country and are making their mark. I feel confident to say that they will remember their time in Eureka. We will remember them.

Larry Coleman

Afterword: Small Town Stewardship: Found Context, Built Solutions Small Town Studio | 2014-2015

 

 

Our Mission Statement for Eureka:

  1. foster sustainable community growth, involvement, and education through planning and design.
  2. improve the overall health, social function and civic pride of the city by introducing public spaces.
  3. build a community vision, identity, and branding that citizens, visitors, and potential new residents can relate to and remember.
  4. repurpose and enhance the existing infrastructure in order to maintain the city’s historical identity and instill a new perspective on its future and its potential.
  5. introduce pedestrian-level connectivity throughout the city, including an improved sidewalk network and dedicated bicycle zones.

Small Town Studio 2013

SMALL TOWN STUDIO

Allison Parr Lee,
Alyse Torrez,
Amy Roether,
Anthony Winkelman,
Austin Walter,
Brian Hampel,
Brian Temple,
Bryce Cummings,
Celia White
Christy Phelps,
David Bartlett,
Dominic Musso,
Duc Nguyen,
Elizabeth Inman Hall,
Erin Pilcher,
Gabriela Hernandez,
Holly Bergan,
Jacob Karst,
Jamie Michel,
John McLaughlin,
Josh Goldstein,
Justin Hodge,
Kate Gladson,
Katherine Connelly,
Katie Guengerich,
Kelsey Angle,
Kelsey Helland,
Kelsey Lind,
Kyle Cooper,
Lance Brannock,
Laura Brown,
Levi Newman,
Marissa Miller,
Ramin Mahmoudian,
Renee Bresson,
Rudy Prins,
Scott Davis,
Sofia Triantafullopoulos,
Stephen Leask,
Vera Smirnova,
Wesley Gross,
Winston Wolf,
Yibo Cui,
Zach Rostetter,

Design as a Project:

Definition: Design as a project refers to a specific, time-bound effort aimed at creating a distinctive product, service, or result.
Characteristics:
Temporary: It has a defined start and end date.
Goal-Oriented: The purpose is to deliver a specific outcome.
Unique: Each project is distinct and tailored to its context.
Structured: It follows a planned sequence of tasks.
Examples: Building a new house, launching a marketing campaign, developing a software application.

Design as a Process:

Definition: Design as a process is an ongoing, iterative approach to problem-solving and creation.
Characteristics:
Continuous: It doesn’t have a fixed end; it evolves over time.
Iterative: It involves cycles of exploration, prototyping, testing, and refinement.
Mindset-Driven: It’s about fostering creativity, empathy, and innovation.
Adaptable: It adjusts based on feedback and changing requirements.
Examples: User experience (UX) design, product development, organizational change.

In summary, design as a project is like building a house—a focused effort with a clear goal. Design as a process is more like gardening—a continuous, adaptable journey of growth and improvement. Both approaches are valuable and complement each other in various contexts.

AN ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
ANIMATED MOVIE,
A SIMPLE STORY OF REBIRTH.

 

 

THE MAN WHO PLANTED TREES
WHEN HIGH SCHOOL 
STUDENTS ENGAGE IN THE PROCESS
OF DESIGN,
WE MUST BE DOING SOMETHING RIGHT.
a movie by two freshmen from our local high school

Eureka Studio

a rural community design center

Larry Coleman
Director

 

Historic district
221 N Main
Eureka Kansas
67045

(360) 551-7725

larry@campestral.us

 

C A M P E S T R A L | FUND
a nonprofit Community Development Fund registered with the
Emporia Community Foundation
a 501c3 organization